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For a genuine tolerance, a struggle must exist, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 72

72 For a genuine tolerance,a struggle must exist and result in our granting an opponent freedom for the sake of our higher law– and precisely when one is absolutely certain that the opponent is in the wrong.  For if one were uncertain, one should not appeal to tolerance at all ... but to the wisdom of waiting for adequate information. 


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


What are the modern stigmata?, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 246

246 What are the modern stigmata?  Sympathetic suffering ... another’s suffering, or distant suffering, but always safe ... as when at a dinner party we wear our brows heavily over the latest crisis in the news media.  To do away with stigmata ... to do away with the need to prove our sympathetic suffering is the next task.  Our need to exhibit ourselves involves a kind of suffering, albeit quite different from the suffering communicated.  That one privately suffers in the struggle away from suffering is enough to make a Buddha out of the least of us.  How false and unholy do all stigmata appear after we sanctify ourselves with our own crucified presumptions?


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The Parasites, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 73

73 The Parasites: He was a person so self-indulgent he had more enemies than friends and was in the end left no resort but to take tolerance as genuine affection. He got closer; the tolerant did not budge.  In this social contract, they did not entangle themselves with something beneath them and he believed he sucked blood from stone. The weak are saved by their imagination.  We should not take it from them.  If we should feel the need to swat the parasite, we would perhaps only be in need of salvation ourselves.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Individualism, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 247

247 I cannot fully separate myself from society, and I cannot fully integrate myself.  I am nothing apart, and nothing wholly within.  Individualism must lie in remaining a small part of a great mountain ... never disintegrating under pressure, but using that same pressure to become, like a diamond from a lump of coal, harder and brighter over time.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


We can tolerate almost any difficulty except, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 74

74 We can tolerate almost any difficulty except those expectations we peg high on ideals which exist, not to guide us toward happiness (although that was the original promise), but to squeeze our imagination through this ignorance of our own condition and out into a discovery of who we really are.  Suddenly we find that the limitless toleration demanded of us by others is often only how we avoid having to tolerate our own plodding minds. 



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Society is the fast talking salesman, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 248

248 Society is the fast talking salesman, talks us into the corner and then charges rent for the whole of our existence.  I am indebted for as long as I listen ... as long as I look beyond myself for rules.

A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


An escapist is someone who, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 75

75 An escapist is someone who refuses to entangle himself with the crowd's projection of his moral duty. He is at his most reprehensible when he refuses to call an outlet for moral superiority his concern for others.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


the institution, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 249

249 Any device the institution uses to enslave I can use to master myself.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


an excess of genius, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 76

76 He had an excess of genius, talent, power, and freedom.  This magnanimous overflow was a sheltering strength ... his compassion.  
They were choking hopelessly on their envy  – then one day he fell and converted their envy into their strength and compassion.  Why, now they even love their enemy.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Look into the machinery of every lasting institution, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 250

250 Look into the machinery of every lasting institution dedicated to a moral end: their power, manipulation, and indoctrination are not evil; only my own control of my own fate is evil.  Very well then, I confess.  I am the devil’s closest ally, for this is the one thing I will never relinquish.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


a petty nature, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 77

77 A refusal to congratulate is an offense which cannot be prosecuted, for the victor who demands the congratulations of a rival exposes not only his dependence upon the other’s approval but his own vanity as well.  The refusal to congratulate may reveal a petty nature, but it gets its little revenge with impunity.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The question is not, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 251

251 The question is not, “Where is society going?”  ... but, “Where would ‘I’ go if I could take control ... of myself?



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


the perfect crime, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 78

78 As for those who would not congratulate me for a success, I would find it unbearable if they should have the opportunity to show sympathy for my downfall.  The more sincerely they believe in their sympathy the more my rude dismissal is compounded with an ingratitude that I can neither defend nor endure.  Their best wishes on my behalf hasten the circulation of the poison already running through my veins.  Humiliating another through sympathy is the perfect crime.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 252

252 Talking about control and having control are as different as giving a sermon is from passing the collection plate around.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


what it is to be human, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 254

254 Truth is what it is to be human.  If something is True, then it already belongs to us.  If it belongs to us from the beginning it cannot be plagiarized.  We should reserve the word “plagiarism” for those non-Me facts certified by others and which we paste together “with originality,”imitating a very precise method of association with another’s genius, all to secure our authority by appeasing those who have secured it themselves, in exactly the same way ... but in its stead we find the word “scholarship” and assign it to those who are ashamed of their own naked thought but somehow manage nonetheless to stand before us confidently, wearing only their caps of authority.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


the greater school for life, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 253

253 Which is the greater school for life, to enjoy privileges or to suffer deprivation?  I do not know the answer, but I do know this at least, that I must learn from life as it presents itself.  And in what other way could I learn this than to grip whatever good or bad luck falls into my hand.  But in either pampering or adversity to complain — “Why precisely this?”  — is to drop the most valuable gem in life: our direct relationship with reality.  Real life begins only after we shout boldly and firmly, “Even this!”



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


petty revenge, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 79

79 It is impossible in this awareness to pity – with sincerity – an enemy who actually craves our sympathy for his misfortune.  We can no longer indulge in the petty revenge of looking down on another through the label, “sympathy.”  And on the other hand we are not built to refuse our sympathy without ourselves suffering from an unavoidable sense of inhuman behavior.  But now this unfortunate soul, in craving a sympathy that we withhold, believes we are cruel precisely where we sought magnanimous behavior Hypocrisy here is not so much the best as it is the only course of action.  And for this hypocrisy, the unfortunate yields us his gratitude!  It is either him or us ... at first glance anyway.  We looked again and found a symbiotic arrangement.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


the intelligent and dignified rival, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 80

80 With the intelligent and dignified rival, all is well.  For his misfortune we refuse to pity out of our sincerest compassion, and for this we have both his gratitude and our own reprieve from a petty dilemma, and for which he has our gratitude as well.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


When the proud suffer misfortune, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 81

81 When the proud suffer misfortune: Grace and peace of mind are nearly impossible for one who places a high value on self-sufficiency but who is suddenly found in a dependent position. Consequently, it is our own complacency and is not a truly magnanimous gesture to throw upon the unfortunate the burden of having to accept our generosity, for he cannot be both polite and refuse us – that is, if he places the same value on magnanimous and self-reliant behavior as we do ourselves.  He now is in the excruciating predicament of having to forgive us magnanimously – yetfrom a position which has already precluded natural magnanimity.  His conduct is the result of a calculated gesture, not a behavioral response.  Our behavior, on the other hand, lacked accurate calculation.  That is, where he is in the nervous position of being forced into the heartless gesture of magnanimity, we indulge naturally, but crudely.  
If we were skillfully magnanimous, we would not have been so obvious with our ge…

real progress, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 255

255 Before, I could not stomach existence and had an appetite only for reading.  Now I cannot keep a single word down.  Books sit before me and I must talk myself into their value or my eyes will not move.  
I consider this real progress.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


our own ethic of sympathy, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 82

82 Others may use their own victimization or weakness to enlist our services.  We do not step in as a benefactor; rather their necessity lords it over us.  Theyexploit and even cultivate their disadvantage, and we now serve them with the same sort of dedication that a butler serves his master.  
We are hooked by our own ethic of sympathyWe hold to a moral standard by which we cannot endure the sight of ourselves as “scoundrels” ... “brutes” ... and nor can we endure the awareness that our “virtues” are only a pretext for serving a different sort of master.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


a historical “graffiti,”, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 256

256 1)Arguments that are built upon names, dates and places are held by people wandering, as it were, through a labyrinth.  There are conflicting signs, a historical “graffiti,” strewn upon the walls, and it is up to the arguers to refute some of the signs and support some of the others, and through this method find their way from room to room.  Of course, it goes without saying that for every passageway “correctly understood” there is an authoritative stamp which one might add to one’s portfolio.   How do two such arguers proceed?  At first we ourselves, as we listen and evaluate, are lost in the labyrinth of ideas, and so we cannot quite discern a method.  However, if we were to conduct a small experiment and stop up our ears, while at the same time trusting only in our observations of human behavior, we would then discover their very simple method: the first task of two such arguers is to open their portfolios immediately and compare stamps. 2)If, on the other hand, the arguers ha…

conceptual geometry, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 83

83 Gratitude ought to extend beyond sufficiency. The less one needs,the weaker the grip that resentment ought to have on us.  One needs very little, has quite a bit, and consequently, there should be very little resentment and much gratitude. This is however conceptual geometry, not physiological consequence. Resentment does not emerge from an awareness of insufficiency.  Thirst wants the water and does not first seek its revenge on the one who withholds it.  Only after quenching its thirst is an overwhelming resentment possible.  Resentment whines and pleads, not for that extravagantly rich dessert others are obviously enjoying, but for their rank and for which the enjoyment is only a badge.  It is not so much food but worthiness that is withheld. Resentment thus wants morethan sufficiency could ever provide.  Usually, it only wants this little pleasure of revenging a slight, however costly the diversion or ugly the behavior.
Gratitude does not hold to the awareness that sufficiency …

our approach to a great mind, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 257

257 The true benefit of our approach to a great mind is in our subsequent breaking away.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


To be dissatisfied with sufficiency, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 84

84 To be dissatisfied with sufficiency is a very human tendency against private happiness but for the advance of civilization.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


between my sovereignty and my dependency, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 258

258 I must dust off this line between my sovereignty and my dependency every day.  And I will not let others tell me to “be reasonable” with an encroachment, for it is always their encroachment that demands “reasonable behavior,” while my every move toward independence serves as an excuse for their “retribution”: conquest and the expulsion of my right to myself.  “Be reasonable?”  Let us recall the history of our borders.  I met their external force with my force.  They pressed all points of my sphere inward.  I ceded much, but what I lost in size, I gained in force — until our opposing forces equalized.  This point, where we both stopped, became our border.  But “Be reasonable?”  I have won what little force I have by ceding much too much already.  I won this ground and not by the laws of debate.  I do not claim it by the laws of their institutions, but have it by the laws of nature.  But “Be reasonable?”  What?  Without first examining the behavior of reasoning? I will not surrende…

lending something that we want back, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 85

85 We lend something instead of making a gift of itbecause we desire it in our possession ... but lending something that we want back really ought to go by name of “borrowing.”  The desire itself inverts the transaction so that the other has lent us our dignity.  Then of course he refuses to return the item.  He had lent us our dignity, and now he wants it back....


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Life itself prepares, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 259

259 Life itself prepares, but not all “preparing” encourages life.  To see this clearly one must know that what we must do often opposes what we should do ... and if one is to have the scales tip toward life one must remove enough of the “shoulds” from the other side.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


What one borrows for dignity, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 86

86 What one borrows for dignity is also borrowed from it. What one lends for dignity is also borrowed from it. 
There is no such thing as Dignity in the marketplace.  Dignity is not transacting.  It gives or refuses to give.It is joined at birth to self-sufficiency and cannot sever itself and live.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Our public “morality”, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 260

260
Our public “morality”: The justifications for our inherited customs, which we defend tooth and nail for the sole reason that we have inherited them.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


a religious faith, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 87

87 One purchases a religious faith with expenditures of truth; hope, with expenditures of means.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 261

261
Moral behavior: Not only that which keeps a people together, but also the justification for their staying together.

Immoral behavior: Breaking rank, breaking away, becoming incomprehensibly simple ... unforgivably self-possessed.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


gratitude , The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 88

88 One cannot overflow with gratitude without implying that one has more than what is sufficient, not less.  It is a contradiction even to ask the question: Why would an overflowing spirit need Hope?  Only the empty spirit needs hope.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Moral behavior,Immoral behavior, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 261

261 Moral behavior: Not only that which keeps a people together, but also the justification for their staying together.
Immoral behavior: Breaking rank, breaking away, becoming incomprehensibly simple ... unforgivably self-possessed.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


To be “Moral” in society, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 262

262 Conceptual Shell games: To be “Moral” in society is to begin with the answer provided.  To be “immoral” is to begin with a question.   That which manages to justify our beginning with questions can only be “amoral.”  It is not “moral” in so far as it begins with the question.  It is not “immoral” in that it has managed to justify such questioning.  Even the actualization of honesty, they would have us believe, must be “amoral.”  
It is difficult to imagine a society where it is forbidden to expose the con-artist, and yet that is precisely how its morality survives.  If I expose this actualized honesty as the only possible kernel under their shell of “amorality,” my head bounces around in a basket.  If I palm this kernel of actualized honesty, loudly and boldly shuffling these emptied concepts, “morality” – “immorality” – “amorality,” their heads bob in approval. 


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Hope is a species of fear, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 89

89 Hope is a species of fear.  It increases to the precise degree that our chances for success diminish.
One most fervently appeals to Hope when one’s resources are at their lowest, when one is closest to the certainty of hopelessness.  Hope is thus more closely related to hopelessness than to its own proposed object.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Public “Morals” and the Solitary Hunter, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 263

263 Public “Morals” and the Solitary Hunter: A true integrity respects the myriad offspring of existence ... both predator and prey.  It never tries to reconcile two opposing, but necessary arguments.  It maintains an ecological balance that will be destroyed if a species is allowed into an incompatible habitat ... for example, if our highest ambition were to stalk its prey within the meadow of “accepted morality.”  To tame the wilderness ... to make an organic process “moral” ... is to grope with a pale, hairless hand into the very depths of nausea.  When will we understand our world?  The lamb shall never lie with the lion ... although the lion may very well lie with some lamb.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


our dissatisfaction with sufficiency, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 90

90 If our dissatisfaction with sufficiency should result in hope, then our hope would be a form of ingratitude.  Conversely, if satisfaction with sufficiency should result in gratitude, then our gratitude would preclude hope.God's creation is either sufficient or insufficient.  If sufficient, any hope is ingratitude.  If insufficient, our hope is extorted by God.God created the world.  God does not deceive.  God, being good, desires our successful outcome.  God being omnipotent, His creation must then be sufficient for us to bring about our own successful outcome.If sufficient, man does not need hope.  A man only hopes to the degree that he doubts the sufficiency of God’s creation.  If he has no doubt, then he does not hope.  The love for and the certainty of the sufficiency of God's creation kills hope.Many claim that the mechanist attempted the murder of their God ... and not that of their hope.   And in actuality, if God's creation is sufficient, then they themselves kil…

Morality, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 264

264 Morality: “Concerned with accepted rules and standards of human behavior.”
The word, “accepted,” is where every external morality ends, for once we have proven the moral point to ourselves we have nothing more to do with its social “acceptability.”



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


a conviction of hopelessness, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 91

91 Someone who reaches a conviction of hopelessness may only be honest with those same conditions with which the self-deceiver anesthetizes himself with hope.  Usually, however, the hopeless man either has no resources sufficient to his task, believes he has none, or he has not the inner resources to transcend his inherited morality and its condemnation of ambition.  In short, he cannot find within himself the right to appropriate real goals ... self-affirming goals.  To suffer from hopelessness, one must have been incapable of either self-deceit or wicked thoughts.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Amorality, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 265

265 Amorality: Concerned with testing and measuring the rules and standards of human behavior, as far as is humanly possible, beyond the interests of one’s group and forever holding judgment between peace of mind and the struggle for honesty ... not to mention all of the other conflicting interests dwelling within one’s private laboratory ... “private,” because it is the only laboratory possible.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The Natural Selection of Hope, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 92

92 The Natural Selection of Hope: In a desperate but apparently futile predicament, it is the one who insists upon mechanical efficiency that is the pessimist and the one who cares nothing for it that is the optimist.  And so out of one hundred optimists and an equal number of pessimists, each of the optimists blindly and therefore confidently “knows what to do.”  In the random scattering of their efforts, each in his stubborn endurance provides a yield for the law of natural selection: one optimist makes it ... while all one hundred pessimists have not so much as lifted a finger, for they have not yet made a distinction between their complacent belief in certainty and their certain ignorance of total conditions ... and dead men telling no tales, the lesson of blind optimism now appears invincible.  Likewise, Hope is often a product of self-deceit: it is a mental escape from an apparently hopeless situation.  It nonetheless has the beneficial function of leaving the hopeful readied, al…

Amorality is an attempt not to be “evil,” A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 266

266 Amorality is an attempt not to be “evil,” just as much as it is an attempt to disregard the inherited “good” — yet better understood as the attempt not to be an accident.  Amorality is the attempt at a real self-control.  It is the pursuit and application of those mechanical forces which account for human conduct.

A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


It’s not enough to be cheerful, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 93

93 It’s not enough to be cheerful; you also need the flames of hell at your back to really get the respect.  There is nothing more insipid than untested cheerfulness. 

A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


the public moral authority, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 267

267 The only constancy with the public moral authority is its claim: “The rule is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow.” The rules themselves however are anything but constant. With private becoming, as I progress from stage to stage I also progress from “rule” to “rule.”
The method of becoming has a constancy of its own, something which manifests itself as a “moral principle” ... or at least as a physical tendency toward the private recognitions of higher and higher “moral principles.”



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Your Royal Highness, The Intellect, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 94

94 Your Royal Highness, The Intellect....  As requested from the carpeted dais, a different version of the story to accommodate your obvious displeasure with the previous....



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


our public moral system, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 268

268 Strength is not in supporting blindly our public moral system.  That is weakness.  Strength is the adjustment of morality according to our private confirmation.  However, what public morality has ever tolerated the adjustment of one of its own members without an involuntary defense: that of re-interpreting this as an “attack” and as originating from outside the bounds of the inherited morality?  (Let us not forget that an externally imposed moral system will always appropriate the “entire” realm of morality to its own ends, which is usually nothing more than its own survival.)  We in turn defend ourselves on our moral ground, which we regard as an attempt at moral legitimacy: our coldest observations of our nearest realities.  We can not be immoral then, they say, for we lack passionate self-abandonment.  No, we are worse than immoral, for we have no concern whatsoever for their morality.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The Invisible Footprints of Bliss, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 95

95 The Invisible Footprints of Bliss: A keen insight into human machinery provokes exasperation.  It contrasts our rank against others, sets off what is against what could have been, and finds that our freedom is more often the consequence of desire than the existence of choice.  When ignorance, however, paints itself into a corner, it does not know it for the matching color.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


the human tendency to apply the labels “good” and “bad.”, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 269

269 We consider science to be amoral.  It does not act according to self-interest.  It sees what it sees regardless of whether it is “Good” or “Evil.”  Its observations are grounded by solid reasoning and not distorted with human vanity, fear, or fancy.  There is no place for the loss of pride when the scientist is in error, nor for the abundance of pride when his experiment is proven correct.   However, science is still a type of morality and can never be fully severed from the human tendency to apply the labels “good” and “bad.”  Consider: if empirical science precludes the “Ideal,” it must then preclude “perfect objectivity” as well.  In fact, the very rigidity of the scientific discipline implies our imperfection in this regard — not to mention our method of “trial and error.”  We are subject to sensory distortion, human drives, “paradigm shifts,” cultural borders, etc.  Next, consider that the scientist is still a herd animal ... a member of his own community, the members of whi…

the truth seeker, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 96

96 The struggle for a stability advantageous to the truth seeker often appears to be the worship of futility.  Complacency and stability are two sides to a single human event: habituation.  What we need is what we resist and what we resist is what we need.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


what I mean with the word “amorality,”, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 270

270 If the reader truly understands what I mean with the word “amorality,” then the reader will understand that the choice of this word is of the least importance, while that which I attempt to represent is of the greatest.  There is a problem with morality: that is, there are two claims to the throne.  The usurper has crowned himself and laid down his self-serving laws, appropriating the title, “Morality.”  He is widely known by this name and has gained the approval of the entire realm, so that when the rightful claimant speaks of his private realm, and the laws pertaining to it, also under the name of “Morality,” no one understands.  They presume the definition as set by the usurper’s culture, by which they either defend or attack.
We rightful claimants must find a new name — one which suggests our honest claim and direct descent from sovereign nature — one which suggests that our private laws are not built upon the same cornerstone as that of the public laws ... so that when we fi…

a moment of vulnerability, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 97

97 It is easy in a moment of vulnerability to place one’s care into the hands of the excessively complacent, transmuting their bold display into our comforting trust in their “competence.”  


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


What one is holding on to, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 271

271 My “Good” is a progression from lower states of clarity toward higher states.  By experimenting with conditions, I do not chain myself to any particular “understanding” but to the physiological progression itself.  Any given “understanding” will soon be discarded in favor of the next, higher interpretation.  What one is holding on to, by way of a few iron habits, can also be called the right to the future.  The entire process demands greater and greater acquisitions of self-control.  This self-control itself turns upon the aim of greater clarity ... and again, for the sake of finding the way to even more control.
Now, if you, dear reader, also seek the same progression, then you understand me, for you live me.  And your understanding me is only confirmation that you have understood yourself.  And this constitutes the interdependence of our immortality.  Each of us must first draw our own line, scratching out the boundary claimed by our own external authorities (from whom we never…

The Joy of Running the Christian Maze, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 98

98 The Joy of Running the Christian Maze: A pagan, we are to believe, is unworthy of any happiness he may have until convinced of his unworthiness.  Only then can he redeem this newfound unworthiness by acknowledging his debt for the happiness of being cured of his former, unmerited happiness.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 272

272 When the word “Expediency” becomes redundant, superfluous and irrelevant — when it remains as vestige ... as evidence of a previous misunderstanding of reality, it will also serve as proof that the word “Morality” no longer designates “tractability” nor “stupidity” ... but has gained legitimacy and our genuine respect.  



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 99

99 The conditions producing the effect of written happiness may not be happy at all.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


What the public morality calls “amoral”, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 273

273 What the public morality calls “amoral” is nothing more than the highest morality possible ... never mind that it is the only morality possible.  What the public calls “moral” is only “wishful thinking” or a harness.  
It is only when the individual cuts himself from the group, becomes a whole unto himself ... when he takes responsibility for his own life and accepts the bounds of his own reality ... it is only at this point that he becomes moral.  



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The Volley of Ideas, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 100

100 The Volley of Ideas: Another's frustration enters one's own game, bounces back and forth between three walls, and often finds its way out all the faster if one does not close in a fourth wall with a suggestion of one's own.


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


Morality does not depend upon, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 274

274 Morality does not depend upon whether or not one permits self-honesty within the equation — everyone does that — but whether or not one permits the destruction of a merely presumed morality for a genuine one by actualizing it.  For those who do not find the innocence in their morality their untested naïvety, we can only communicate our amorality, that being as far as their thought can go to meet our actualization without provoking their own.  



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


to do nothing with confusion, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 101

101 I know that it is important at times to do nothing with confusion but wait for habituation to re-establish my equilibrium, but I rarely have the patience for this sort of “neglect.”


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


The brain is the fulcrum upon, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 275

275 The brain is the fulcrum upon which a trinket lifts the infinite.



A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


one ultimate reality, A Human Strategy, Matt Berry, aphorism 276

276 There must be, of course, only one ultimate reality.  (I am speaking of a physical and not a conceptual ultimate reality.) However, the human brain is not equipped to perceive that single reality.  Instead we have multiple and therefore fragmented perceptions upon this single ultimate reality ... perceptions from which we then reconstruct, on our own terms, a “mental whole.”  This mental whole is not the same as the physical ultimate reality.  However, the evolution of the mental whole is more than just a series of errors: it serves as a kind of signposting ...  a finding one’s way toward higher and higher perceptions.  Thismental whole, this reconstruction of the universe through the resolution of contradictions, is my “spiritual” process and is dependent upon a naturalphenomenon which I like to call, “Repetition.”


A Human Strategy ** The Mechanics of Virtue ** Post-Atheism


One of the animal behaviorist’s tricks, The Mechanics of Virtue, Matt Berry, aphorism 102

102 One of the animal behaviorist’s tricks is to take something from or add something to the harmony of a creature.  He leaves one creature alone, throws the other out of harmony, and then compares the two.  He can then calculate what this missing or added thing does or does not do.  After such an experiment, the scientist is in a better position to describe the parts that contribute to its normal state.  
I consider an ethologist the desirable model for an individual's quest for truth.  If the reader can accept this premise, then it follows that an introspective truth seeker is neither himself capable of permanent happiness nor of honestly proposing the discovery of truthas a means toward happiness.  For truth, the seeker constantly throws himself out of balance, recording the push out of and the return toward equilibrium, comparing states and securing knowledge – whose method entails a cycle from order to chaos to orderAgain and again, he experiments withharmony and does not …